Denmark Visa Requirements: Danish visa application form information on Denmark visas for travel, tourist visa, visitor / transit visa, student visa. Danish embassy address, information on Denmark immigration procedures for US citizens, Canadians, Indians, Australians, UK, EU citizens.

Denmark Visa Information

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Who requires a visa?
If you are a citizen of one of the following countries, you must have a visa in order to enter Denmark:
Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belarus, Belize, Benin, Bhutan, Bolivia*, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burma (Myanmar), Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, China**, Colombia, Comoros, Congo, Cuba, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt*, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Ghana, Grenada, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, India*, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ivory Coast, Jamaica, Jordan, Kazakhstan****, Kenya, Kiribati, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Maldives, Mali, Marshall Islands, Mauritania, Micronesia, Moldova, Mongolia, Montenegro**** (Citizens with biometric passports are exempt from the visa requirement. Biometric passports have been issued since May 2008. All new passports are biometric) , Morocco*, Mozambique, Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, North Korea, Northern Marianas, Oman, Pakistan*, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Peru****, Philippines*, Qatar, Russia****, Rwanda, Samoa, Sao Tomé and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia**** (Citizens with biometric passports are exempt from the visa requirement. This does not apply to persons with passports issued by the Serbian Coordination directorate Koordinaciona uprava. Biometric passports have been issued since July 2008) , Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, St. Lucia, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Sudan, Suriname, Swaziland, Syria, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Thailand*, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia****, Turkey***, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Uganda, Ukraine****, United Arab Emirates, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Vietnam, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Passports issued by the Palestinian Authority.

If you are a citizen of one of the following countries, you do not need a visa in order to enter Denmark:
All countries and territories that are members of the Schengen acquis, of the EU or of EFTA. Positive visa list of countries (also known as White Schengen List) from whose citizens no visa is required to enter the territory of the EU member states for a period of maximum 90 days.

Albania*****, Andorra***, Antigua and Barbuda , Argentina, Austria*, Australia (including the Cocos Islands, Norfolk Island, Christmas Island)**, Bahamas, Barbados, Belgium*, Bermuda, Bosnia and Herzegovina*****, Brazil***, Brunei, Bulgaria*, Canada**, Chile, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus*, Czech Republic*, Denmark*, El Salvador, Estonia*, Finland*, France*(including French Guyane, French Polynesia, Guadeloupe, Macedonia (FYROM) (Citizens with biometric passports are exempt from the visa requirement. Biometric passports have been issued since April 2007) ,Martinique, New Caledonia, Réunion, St Pierre and Miquelon), Germany, Greece*, Guatemala, Honduras***, Hungary*, Iceland**, Ireland*, Israel**, Italy*, Japan**, Korea (South)**, Latvia*, Liechtenstein**, Lithuania*, Luxembourg*, Macao, Macedonia (FYROM) (Citizens with biometric passports are exempt from the visa requirement. Biometric passports have been issued since April 2007)”, Malaysia, Malta*, Mauritius, Mexico, Monaco***, Montenegro*****, Netherlands*, New Zealand (including the Cook Islands, Niue, Tokelau)**, Nicaragua, Norway*, Panama, Paraguay, Poland*, Portugal*, Romania*, Saint Christopher and Nevis, San Marino***, Serbia******, Seychelles, Singapore, Slovak Republic*, Slovenia*, Spain* (including Spanish territories in North Africa with Ceuta and Melilla), Sweden*, Switzerland**, Taiwan, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (including the Channel Islands, the Isle of Man and Bermuda)*****, United States of America (including Virgin Islands of the United States, American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico)**, Uruguay, Vatican City, Venezuela. Without a visa, however, citizens of the above countries may not stay longer than three months every half-year or take up gainful employment requiring a work permit. Excepted are the following.

  • * Citizens of European Union member states.
  • ** If required, citizens of member states of the European Economic Area and some other countries may obtain a residence and/or work permit after entry.
  • *** Provided that they do not intend to enter into employment, citizens of Honduras, Monaco, San Marino may obtain any residence permit required after entry.
  • ***** British Nationals (Overseas) with corresponding BN(O) passports are also exempt from the visa requirement.
  • ***** The visa waiver applies only to holders of biometric passports.
  • ****** The visa waiver applies only to holders of biometric passports (excluding holders of Serbian passports issued by the Serbian Coordination Directorate (in Serbian: Koordinaciona uprava)

What documents will be required?
– Valid national passport or other valid travel identification.
– Two passport photos. The photo must be 35 mm x 45 mm (size of head 30-36 mm from the bottom of the chin to the top of the head). You must be facing the camera directly.
– An invitation, if possible, from your reference in Denmark, with information about the persons you will visit, as well as name and address, purpose of your visit, and a description of the relationship between you and your reference in Denmark.
– Information about CPR number and Alien Identification number (if applicable) of your reference in Denmark.

You may in some cases be asked to produce additional documentation when submitting your application. In most cases, you will be charged a processing fee. As such, it is a good idea to contact the diplomatic mission in question prior to submitting your visa application.

You are advised not to purchase closed airline tickets or travel insurance before the diplomatic mission confirms that you are eligible for a visa.

Time required to issue visa:
The overwhelming majority of visa applications are processed and decided on by Danish diplomatic missions abroad. These cases will usually be decided within a few days. Some cases, however, may take 10-12 days.

Cases handled by the Immigration Service, including most applications to visit friends and family, have an average processing time of approximately ten weeks.

The average processing time for other types of visas, e.g. business visas and visas for cultural visits, is four to six weeks.

In the case of applications for business visas, the Immigration Service will normally send a questionnaire to the contact in Denmark. If there is sufficient information to make a decision after the contact has filled out the questionnaire, the processing time should be no more than 30 days.

The average processing time for extension of a visa/temporary stay is currently one to two weeks.

The Immigration Service calculates processing times based on the date the application was received. The times listed here are rough averages. Some cases will be processed faster, while others may take longer.

What is the cost of a visa?
A fee shall be charged upon submission of all types of applications for visas, including from spouses entered in the other spouse’s passport and from children aged 6 years and above entered in their parents’ passports, at a Danish Embassy or Consulate abroad with the exceptions specified below.

Generally, visa fees shall be charged for the work involved in processing the application, and thus shall not be reimbursed if the application is rejected. However, if an applicant decides not to submit an application following a (brief) statement by the Embassy or Consulate concerning the likelihood of the application being accepted, no fee shall be charged. No fee shall be charged for investigating whether a visa is required.

a. Danish visa fees pursuant to Schengen
If the applicant submits his/her application to a Danish diplomatic mission (embassy or consulate general) he/she will normally have to pay a fee. Most embassies and consulates charge a €60 (about DKK 450) fee. The individual diplomatic mission can also make further demands such as extra passport photos or duplicate copies of the application. We recommend that the applicant checks with the requirements on the website of the diplomatic mission before submitting the application.
b. Exceptions from the obligation to pay
Fees shall not be levied for the issue of visas in the following cases:

- Persons with travel documents issued by countries whose own nationals are exempt from requiring visas (travel documents for refugees and aliens’ passports).

- Diplomats and persons travelling on official business for their country and, following local assessment, in connection with private travel, as well as their accompanying spouses and children.

- Travelling persons employed at the UN Secretariat, at UN organisations (foundations, programmes and special organisations), at OSCE institutions as well as travelling members of the Council of Europe and their accompanying spouses and children.

- Persons who have a declaration to the effect that they are travelling on business pertaining to the UN or to one of the above-mentioned organisations, etc.

- Employees of Global Biodiversity Facility (GBIF) in Copenhagen and persons working for the GBIF Board in connection with conferences, meetings etc as well as their accompanying spouses and children.

- Employees of the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES) in Copenhagen, and persons working for the ICES Board in connection with conferences, meetings etc as well as their accompanying spouses and children.

- Employees of the European Radio communications Office (ERO) in Copenhagen and persons working for the ERO Board in connection with conferences, meetings etc as well as their accompanying spouses and children.

- Employees of Eurofish in Copenhagen and persons working for the Eurofish Board in connection with conferences, meetings etc as well as their accompanying spouses and children.

- Employees of the European Environment Agency (EEA) in Copenhagen and persons working for the EEA Board in connection with conferences, meetings etc as well as their accompanying spouses and children.

- Spouses and registered partners of citizens from an EU/EEA Member State other than Denmark and their children or the children of the spouse/partner who are not yet 21 years old or who are dependents of the EU/EEA citizen, as well as relatives in the direct line of ascent and the spouse’s/partner’s relatives in the direct line of ascent who are dependents of the EU/EEA citizen. Such members of the families of Danish citizens who exercise their right to free movement in another EU Member State are covered by the exception. The EU/EEA rules also apply to Switzerland. Foreign Service staff, their spouses and children under the age of 21 who are part of the household.

- At the discretion of the Embassy or Consulate, students, athletes, etc. may be granted exemption from paying fees where trips take place as part of an exchange agreement, amateur sports event, amateur concert event and the like, or if the Embassy or Consulate considers such exemption appropriate for other reasons. In all such cases, the relevant reason shall be recorded in the files.

- Applicants under six years old.

- School pupils, students, postgraduate students and accompanying teachers, who undertake trips for the purpose of study or other educational training,

- Researchers from third countries travelling within the Community for the purpose of carrying out scientific research as defined in the Recommendation 2005/761/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of
28 September 2005 to facilitate the issue by the Member States of uniform short-stay visas for researchers from third countries travelling within the Community for the purpose of carrying out scientific research.

How long is the visa valid for?
A visa allows you to stay a maximum of 90 days per 6 months in Denmark.

A visa normally grants you the right to stay in the entire Schengen region. The Schengen countries are Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain and Sweden.

If you are a citizen of a country with no visa requirement to enter Denmark, you can also stay in the Schengen region for a maximum of 90 days per 6 months.

The six-month period is calculated from the date of first entry into the Schengen region. Both the entire day of the date of entry and the entire day of the date of exit are included in the number of days you have stayed in the Schengen region – regardless of the time of day the entry or exit took place.

The date of ‘first entry’ is:

- the date on which you entered the Schengen region for the first time, and subsequently
– the date of any subsequent entry into the Schengen region which takes place after the expiration of a six-month period.

Example of ‘first entry’

If you arrive for the first time in Denmark or another Schengen country on 1 February 2008, you can stay in the Schengen region for a period of three months (90 days) within the six-month period which ends on 31 July 2008.

If you return again on 1 October 2008 – i.e. more than six months after your very first entry into the Schengen region – this date will constitute a new ‘first entry’. Therefore, 1 October 2008 constitutes the beginning of a new six-month period during which you can stay in the Schengen region for a period of up to three months.

If you arrive again on 1 June 2009, it will be this date which constitutes the next date of ‘first entry’, and so on.
Residence permit from another Schengen country

If you are a citizen of a country with a visa requirement to enter Denmark, and you hold a residence permit issued by another Schengen country, you do not necessarily need to apply for a visa in order to enter Denmark. In most cases, your residence permit in the other Schengen country will allow you to enter Denmark without a visa.

Please note that it is your own responsibility to know how long your visa allows you to stay in Denmark.

Other information:
Denmark is very keen to attract foreign students to the country.

If you would like to study at a college of further education etc. in Denmark, you must have been granted a residence permit before your arrival in Denmark. To be granted a residence permit, you must be able to document:

- That you have been enrolled on a course of further education which is approved by a state authority or which is offered by a state-approved educational institution.
– That you can support yourself during your stay, or that you have paid tuition fees.
– That you can speak and understand the language used to teach the course, and that you can speak and understand Danish, Swedish, Norwegian, English or German at a reasonable level.

Basically, as a foreign student, you can obtain a residence permit while you complete your studies/training in Denmark and for participating in part of the education/training as a guest student.

If you complete a higher educational programme in Denmark, you can also remain in the country for six months after you have finished your education/training in order to look for work. You will also be granted a permit to work 15 hours a week alongside your studies as well as for full-time work in June, July and August.



Disclaimer: The contents of these pages are provided as an information guide only, in good faith. The use of this website is at the viewer/user’s sole risk. While every effort is made in presenting up-to-date and accurate information, no responsibility or liability is accepted by the owners to this website for any errors, omissions, outdated or misleading information on these pages or any site to which these pages connect or are linked.

Source & Copyright: The source of the above visa and immigration information and copyright owner/s is the:
– Royal Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs – URL: www.um.dk
– Danish Immigration Service- URL: www.nyidanmark.dk

The viewer/user of this web page should use the above information as a guideline only, and should always contact the above sources or the user’s own government representatives for the most up-to-date information at that moment in time, before making a final decision to travel to that country or destination.