France Visa Requirements: French visa application form information on France visas for travel, tourist visa, visitor / transit visa, student visa. French embassy address, information on France immigration procedures for US citizens, Canadians, Indians, Australians, UK, EU citizens.

France Visa Information

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Who requires a visa?
Several factors determine whether a visa is required:

- the nationality of the foreign national;
– the holding of a residence document in France or another country adhering to the Schengen Agreement;
– the length of stay;
– and which part of the territory of the French Republic the foreign national is to visit.

As far as visas are concerned, legislation divides the territory of the French Republic into the following three sections, where different regulations apply:

- the European territory of France, which is part of the Schengen area;
– the territory of Overseas Departments (Réunion, Martinique, Guadeloupe and French Guiana);
– Overseas territorial communities: French Polynesia, New Caledonia, Mayotte, French Southern and Antarctic Territories.

1. The European territory of France
The European territory of France is part of the Schengen area. The Schengen area includes the territory of the following European Union countries and associated countries: Austria, Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and Switzerland.

1.1. Short stays (under 90 days in the Schengen area)
A short stay is a stay in the Schengen area under 90 days or multiple stays totalling less than 90 days in a period of six months.

For short stays, European regulations determine the list of countries from which citizens are not required to have a visa to enter the Schengen area.

A visa is waived for:
– citizens of the following countries: Andorra, Argentina, Australia, Bermuda, Brazil, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Croatia, El Salvador, Guatemala, Holy See, Honduras, Israel, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Monaco, Nicaragua, New Zealand, Panama, Paraguay, San Marino, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, United States, Uruguay, Venezuela & Member States of the European Union and the European Economic Area (EEA);
– holders of passports from the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China and the Special Administrative Region of Macao of the People’s Republic of China;
– holders of a valid residence document in France;
– holders of a residence document issued by a country which adheres to the Schengen Agreement;
– holders of a travel document issued by a country which adheres to the Schengen Agreement.

1.2. Long stays (over 90 days in France)
Citizens of the following countries are not required to have a long-stay visa: Member States of the European Union and the European Economic Area (EEA), Switzerland, Monaco and Andorra.

2. Overseas Departments (DOM)
– Réunion
– French Guiana, Guadeloupe and Martinique (the three French Departments of the Americas)

2.1. Short stays
A short stay is a stay under 90 days in an Overseas Department.
A visa is waived for:
– citizens of the following countries: Andorra, Argentina, Australia, Bermuda, Bolivia, Brunei, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Croatia, El Salvador, Guatemala, Holy See, Honduras, Japan, Malaysia, Mexico, Monaco, Nicaragua, New Zealand, Panama, Paraguay, San Marino, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, United States, Uruguay, Venezuela & Member States of the European Union and the European Economic Area (EEA);
– holders of passports from the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China and the Macao Special Administrative Region of the People’s Republic of China;
– holders of a valid residence document in France.

2.1. Long stays
Citizens of the following countries are not required to have a long-stay visa: Member States of the European Union and the European Economic Area (EEA), Switzerland, Monaco and Andorra.

3. Other territories of the French Republic located overseas
They include:
– French Polynesia
– New Caledonia
– Wallis and Futuna
– Saint Pierre and Miquelon
– Mayotte
– French Southern and Antarctic Territories

3.1. Short stays
A short stay is a stay under 90 days.
A visa is waived for the citizens of the following countries:
Andorra, Argentina, Australia, Bermuda, Bolivie, Brunei, Bermuda, Bolivia, Canada, Chile, Costa Rica, Croatia, El Salvador, Guatemala, Holy See, Honduras, Hong Kong, Japan, Macao, Malaysia, Mexico, Monaco, Nicaragua, New Zealand, Panama, Paraguay, San Marino, Singapore, South Korea, Switzerland, United States, Uruguay, Venezuela & Member States of the European Union and the European Economic Area (EEA).

3.2. Long stays
Citizens of the following countries are not required to have a long-stay visa: Member States of the European Union and the European Economic Area (EEA), Switzerland, Monaco and Andorra.

What documents will be required?
To apply for a Schengen short-stay visa, you are required to present one visa application per person, including the following items:
– A passport which is valid for at least 3 months after the date of the requested visa;
– [A visa application form] duly completed and signed;
– A maximum of 3 photographs meeting requirements;
– Application fees. Visa application forms for a child under 18 years of age must be signed by a parent or legal guardian.

If any of the items you provide do not fulfil our criteria, consular personnel will not accept your application and will ask you to present items which do. If you insist on submitting your application anyway, your application will be recorded but a visa will not be issued and the other items in the application will not be studied.

Proof
– Proof of the purpose of your stay in the Schengen area;
– Proof of your means of support during your stay and accommodation;
– Proof of travel and repatriation insurance;
– Guarantees of repatriation to your country of residence (return ticket or adequate personal means to purchase one);
– For children under 18 years of age, specific proof;
– Any documents helping to convince the consular authority of your intention to leave the Schengen area when your visa expires.

Certain diplomatic and consular authorities that issue visas on ordinary passports may include more detailed information taking local specificities into account. These items providing proof that are are required are to be presented to the consular authority.

The consular authority will accept your application as provided by you and will make his decision on the basis of the guarantees and proof attached to your application. If you have failed to attach the proof included in the list, the consular authority will assume that you are unable to do so unless you effectively explain why such proof was omitted in a separate letter attached to the application.

Additional documents
The consular authority may ask you to provide additional documents within a set period in order to study your application more effectively. You do not need to submit a new application nor pay additional application fees if that is the case.

Proof that a visa application has been submitted
When you submit your visa application, the consular authority will give you a receipt for the exact amount of application fees you paid. This receipt is acknowledgement of receipt of your application.

Time required to issue visa:
After a visa application is submitted, the consular authority processes it and decides on whether to issue a visa.

The consular authority makes his decision as swiftly as possible, the time period will vary depending on possible consultations he must conduct. There is no point in contacting the consular authority while the application is being processed.

If the consular authority has not responded to you within two months, you may consider that your visa application has been refused.

What is the cost of a visa?
The table below sets forth the application fees in euros for the main visa categories.

Visa categories Application fees (in euros)
Airport transit visas and short-stay visas (under 90 days) valid for France and, unless otherwise indicated on the visa, for the Schengen area €60
Airport transit visas and short-stay visas (under 90 days) valid for Overseas Departments and Regions (DOM-ROM): Guadeloupe, (including Saint Barthélemy and Saint Martin); Martinique; French Guiana; Réunion. €60
Airport tranist visas or short-stay visas (under 90 days) for New Caledonia, French Polynesia, Wallis and Futuna, Saint Pierre and Miquelon, Mayotte and French Southern and Anatartic Territories €9
Long-stay visas (over 90 days) valid for France (without a territorial distinction) €99
National long-stay visa (over 90 days) issued to foreign nationals adopted by French citizens in the legal and definitive form required in their countries of origin, valid for Metropolitan France, Overseas Departments and Overseas Communities €15

Reduced fee: Application fees for citizens of Albania, Bosnia, Macedonia, Moldavia, Montenegro, Russia, Serbia and Ukraine are set at 35 euros for short-stay visas.

How long is the visa valid for?
Short stay visas: Up to 90 days
Temporary long-stay visas: Up to 6 months
Long stay visas: The residency permit obtained actually determines the length of the stay

Other information:
American citizens intending to study in France have to apply for a visa before leaving the United States, whatever the duration of their studies in France. The visa cannot be issued once the applicant is in France.

NOTE: Students who will be 18 years old within 3 months of the dates of registration in a French school, must apply for a Long Stay Student visa.

The visa issued will depend on the duration of the studies in France :
– Less than 90 days: you have to apply for a short term Schengen visa (type C) by filling out a short stay application form.
– Between 90 days and six months: you have to apply for a temporary long term visa by filling out 2 long stay application forms.
With such a visa, you will not have to go to the prefecture to ask for a residency card (carte de séjour) in France.

- More than six months : you have to apply for a long stay visa by filling out 2 long stay application forms.
With such a visa, you will have to apply, as soon as you arrive in France, for a residency card with the French prefecture which has jurisdiction for the place where you are studying.

Embassy contact information:
Embassies & Consulates of France to Other Nations
France French Courses in Chamonix



Disclaimer: The contents of these pages are provided as an information guide only, in good faith. The use of this website is at the viewer/user’s sole risk. While every effort is made in presenting up-to-date and accurate information, no responsibility or liability is accepted by the owners to this website for any errors, omissions, outdated or misleading information on these pages or any site to which these pages connect or are linked.

Source & Copyright: The source of the above visa and immigration information and copyright owner/s is the:
– Ministère des Affaires étrangères, France – URL: www.diplomatie.gouv.fr
– Consulat General of France in Washington – URL: www.consulfrance-washington.org

The viewer/user of this web page should use the above information as a guideline only, and should always contact the above sources or the user’s own government representatives for the most up-to-date information at that moment in time, before making a final decision to travel to that country or destination.