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International Relations / Economics graduate programs in Japan

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Graduate School of International Relations, International University of Japan, Niigata:
The Graduate School of International Relations (GSIR) at the International University of Japan (IUJ) is dedicated to acquire a long-term vision of the rapidly changing world, apreciating diverse perspectives in global and local contexts, and ehancing their analytical skills and problem-solving capabilities in a wide range of contemporary international affairs. GSIR also encourages academic research beneficial to the development of its faculty's teaching and supervisory skills as well as students' capability in the fields of public management, international relations, international peace studies, international development and economics, utilizing the experiences of Japan and the Asia-Pacific region. All programs are conducted in English.

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GSIR offers Master's degrees in:
- Public Management
- International Relations
- International Peace Studies
- International Development
- Economics

IDP Core Required Courses

Mathematics and Computing for Economics
The course introduces a variety of fundamental mathematical tools that are useful in analyzing economic and social issues. Computer programs such as Excel and Mathematica are an integral part of the course.

Statistics for Business and Economics
This course introduces students to basic theories of probability. The objective of the course is to understand the assumptions (requirements) of statistical decision making and to use the theory of probability to aid your decision making in the real world. For example, you will learn how to approach the following problem. It is said that there were 18.7 million births in China during 2003 and that the reported sex ratio was 117 boys for each 100 girls. Do you think this reported sex ratio is likely if the probability of having a boy versus girl is 50/50?

Research Methodology
The course provides students with a working knowledge of research methods and techniques. These are the basis for the systematic and objective search for and analysis of information relevant to problem-analysis and problem-solving in the field of international development.

Microeconomics
The course delineates two fundamental issues in microeconomics: 1) Predicting the outcome of a game, and 2) evaluating the social desirability of the outcome. The course focuses on the market mechanism in various economic environments and reviews various theoretical as well as practical attempts to design institutional arrangements that assist or substitute for the functions of the market mechanism.

Macroeconomics
The purpose of this course is twofold. Firstly it expands the macroeconomic model discussed in the Basic Macroeconomics (BPC 4020) to incorporate the uncertainty and expectations explicitly. It will enable us to gain a deeper insight into the effects of macroeconomic policies and address a set of questions that have been impossible in the basic models. Secondly it reviews models of economic growth to study the long run behavior of the aggregate economy. The models provide theoretical and empirical frameworks to formulate the issues of growth policies.

Applied Econometrics
The course introduces basic econometric techniques including advanced linear regression, discrete dependent variables, truncated models, simultaneous equations, and time series models. Emphasis is placed on applied methods rather than econometric theory.

Development Economics
This course covers major ideas in development economics, looking at both theoretical models and empirical issues. Topics include growth models, human capital issues, intra-household economics, migration, land tenancy, rural credit markets, risk coping, and other economic issues particularly relevant to developing countries. To develop empirical skills useful for your research, students learn how to analyze data using Stata or other statistical software. By the end of the course, students should be familiar with major concepts in development economics and be ready to start using Stata for their own research.


IDP Elective Required Courses

Quantitative Methods for Decision Making
The course provides students with a working knowledge of quantitative techniques for decision making in development management. Topics covered include decision theory, optimization techniques, and project scheduling and management.

Quantitative Analysis of Economic Policies
The purpose of the course is twofold. The first is to teach students econometric and computational skills so that they can better understand extant research papers in the area of economic development. The second is to help students to undertake quantitative analyses on their own while using the skills learned in the course.

Development Planning

The course introduces techniques and models of socio-economic development planning and policy analysis. It discusses the structure, major components, and process of socio-economic development planning.

Computational General Equilibrium Modeling
This course will give students an introductory explanation about the computational overlapping generations model within a general equilibrium framework. The course will cover topics such as a basic framework of overlapping generations model, a concept of general equilibrium, and FORTRAN computer programming. An emphasize will be particularly given to full understanding of the simple overlapping generations model and computational applications of the model in order for students to analyze/evaluate actual public policies within a computational/numerical framework. Students will be asked to apply a computational model to analyze their own countries in their term paper.

Health Economics
In this course, we learn how to apply microeconomics tools to the study of health care issues, recognizing the importance of scarcity and incentives. The goal of this course is to equip students with basic tools to critically consider a health care financing system that is financially sustainable as well as accessible to those in need. We start with market failure in health care financing and observe rapid growth in health care spending in many countries across the world. We then closely look at the peculiar characteristics of health care markets that need to be addressed in designing health care financing systems.

Public Sector Economics
The world economy is contemplating a further round of deregulation and privatization. In this dynamic context, it is critical to understand what economic activities government should or should not be responsible for and why. This course provides a theoretical framework to analyze actual public sector economic issues as well as practical applications of that framework.

Agricultural Economics
This course focuses on economic forces which influence agricultural commodity movements and behavior. This involves study into the theoretical basis of price determination as well as empirical estimation of economic models to identify forces that determine prices. In this course, significant attention is given to international trade and the effect of exchange rates, tariffs and quota on trade.

Macroeconometric Analysis of Developing Economies
Macroeconometric models have become one of the most important tools for policy makers of the day in quantifying the impacts of various policies on their economies and for forecasting.

This course is also designed to provide a clear understanding of the salient features, challenges and opportunities of the participants' own economies. They will also learn to use econometric models to quantify the effectiveness of various government policies on the economy. A prior knowledge of basic statistics, applied econometrics and macroeconomics is useful. Furthermore, the course will use Excel and Eviews and learning partners are supposed to know how to use them in advance. This course is highly recommended for students who intend to do quantitative analysis in their thesis writing.

Project Cycle Management (FASID Course)
The course introduces basic project cycle theory. Topics to be covered include project evaluation and shadow pricing, cost-benefit analysis, and project planning.

Development Finance
This course studies the contemporary issues and problems of financing capital accumulation in developing economies, where capital refers to assets used for producing both private goods and public goods. The mechanism employed for financing capital accumulation takes various forms, ranging from a tax system to a financial market. The choice of a mechanism depends on the characteristics of goods and services produced by the use of capital and the nature of coordination problems to be solved by the mechanism. The focus of this course is developing economies in which neither market mechanism nor taxation system is well developed for financing investment.

International Finance
This course surveys the determination of exchange rates and theories of balance of payments adjustments. It also explores open economy macroeconomics and analyzes some of the institutional details of foreign exchange markets, balance of payments accounting, and the international monetary system. The policy issues addressed in the course include the choice of foreign exchange rate regime, regulations over international capital flows, the architecture of international monetary system, and policy coordination among nations under alternative international monetary systems.

Public Finance
This course will introduce students basic concepts of public finance, particularly in the context of macroeconomic policies by referring to advanced macroeconomics with microeconomics foundations. In the first half of the course, basic macroeconomic models commonly applied in pubic finance such as the infinitely lived agent model and the overlapping generations model will be taught, and the other half of the course will cover applications of the basic models in several fields related to public finance: Economic growth, human capital & education, and population economics. One of the aims of this course is to give students powerful and sufficient techniques to evaluate/analyze actual public finance policies ongoing in their home countries with rigorous economics tools.

Governance Structure and Economic Development
The course cultivates the analytical capability of students to understand and discern the internal conditions and external environment of governance structures in the context of economic development.

Financial Programming and Policy
This course will introduce students to the process of formulating a hypothetical macroeconomic and structural adjustment program, which will help the students acquire basic skills in managing economic performance of a country. The students will be exposed to basic concepts of macroeconomic behavioral and accounting relationships that form a sound basis for analyzing economic developments and formulating economic policies. The students are expected to complete workshops, including writing a short report, in lieu of a final examination.

Political Economy of Energy and the Environment
The course analyzes the historical world-wide development of the oil and natural gas industries, relations between OPEC/OAPEC and oil importing countries, the first and second oil crises, and the recent oil glut situation. The problem of securing energy supplies while maintaining a healthy ecology and environment will also be explored.

Environmental Economics
This course is aimed to provide a guide to the important areas of environmental economics. Lectures try to motivate students to use analytical tools to deal with the environmental problems. Given the limited number of lectures, the course focuses on efficiency, market failure, market-based incentives for environmental protection, regulation of pollution, transboundary pollution, and problems arising from uncertainty about environmental discharges and asymmetric information about pollution control costs. This course focuses on both the theoretical aspects of the environmental problems and applications to real problems.

International Trade and Commercial Policy
The course is an introduction to the theory of international trade and commercial policy. The first part focuses on the neoclassical theory of trade, including the nature of trade itself, its causes, and its welfare effects. The second part discusses obstacles to free trade, including strategic trade and commercial policies. Finally, selected topics on the macroeconomics of an open economy are introduced.

Industrial Organization and Public Policy
In this course, we will analyze the behavior of firms under different industry structure and evaluate antitrust policies and other government regulations of business. Topics include static competition in oligopolies, cartels and other forms of collusive behavior, competition between firms producing differentiated products, entry behavior, R&D behavior, merger analysis, price discrimination, natural monopoly regulation, environmental regulation, patents, and other government interventions in the markets (e.g., antitrust laws).

Cost Benefit Analysis
The course familiarizes students with a powerful decision-making tool: the technique of cost-benefit analysis (also referred to as project appraisal). The course begins with the financial analysis of investment expenditures and then proceeds to the economic and distributive appraisal of development projects. It exposes students to the theoretical principles and practical applications of cost-benefit analysis.


IDP Elective Required Courses


Development of Japanese Industry and Business

How did Japan achieve a rapid economic development? Why does Japan have its unique economic and business systems? These are questions asked in this course. It analyzes the history and process of Japanese industrialization and also the transformation of Japanese industrial and business systems from 1868 to the present. I shall focus on such factors as: industrial relations, industrial organization, government_business relations, trading firms, and management systems.

Japanese Banking and Financial Systems
The financial system of Japan, particularly its banking sector, has frequently been in the news over the years since 1990 when Japan’s asset-price ‘bubble’burst and the economy entered a period of stagnation. This course first covers the role of banking and finance in the economy. It introduces some of the central issues and ideas in modern theories of banking and finance in the light of recent thinking about the relationship between banking, finance and the real economy. Then, concentrating on the experience in the 1990s, this course examines some of the important implications of the Japan's financial system, which has relevance beyond Japan itself.

Chinese Economy
The course outlines the structure of Chinese economy as well as China's economic growth after 1979. First, it reviews the growth of Chinese economy at the macro-level. The evolution from a central planning economy to a mixed economy is the background of the review. It will then discuss the dynamic change of Chinese economic policies through the reforms in the Agriculture, Industry, Foreign Trade sectors as well as banking and financial markets.

OPEC and Economic Development
The course analyzes the economic development and related socio-political problems of oil exporting countries, focusing on the Gulf OPEC members. The economic cooperation of Japan and other advanced nations with these oil exporting countries will also be examined.

IRP Core Required Courses

International Political Economy
International Political Economy (IPE) is a sub-field of International Relations. IPE is the study of relations between international politics and international economics. The main objective of this course is to familiarize students with the dynamic linkages between states and markets in the regional and global context. The course deals with both the theoretical aspects of and major issues in IPE. It begins with an analysis of concepts, theories and approaches. This is followed by an examination of the major issues in the literature of IPE.

International Politics
The aim of this course is to provide students with a conceptual foundation for the study of international politics as well to introduce students to the major issues of global security. It will examine the realist, institutionalist, and constructivist approaches; it will then analyze the major issues of international politics today including the environment, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and international terrorism. The course will include a student forum on international terrorism and the US response.

History of International Relations
This course examines aspects of international relations history from a Eurasian-Pacific perspective. Its objectives are to provide students with an alternative to traditional "Western centered" approaches to the subject, to examine developments in international society from a very long term point of view and to study, in a regional historical context, the operation and efficacy of hegemonic systems, balances of power, concerts of empires and policies of strategic accommodation. The course also looks at the issues of ideological confrontations, clashes of civilizations, transmissions of culture and the emergence of historico-cultural communities. Throughout, comparisons are made between historical patterns that emerged in East Asia and the Pacific, and tendencies that came to prevail in the Mediterranean and North Atlantic worlds.

International Economic Systems and Order
The course aims to study the international economic systems, monetray system, trading system, capital transfer, information, energy and primary commodity, etc., and the international economic order to maintain the systems, analyzing the economic structure of each economy in Aisa and Pacific countries based on theories of international economics and open-economy macro economics. The course also examines the importance of mutual interdependence considering the competition and cooperation, and the market principle and policy coordination among nations in the global economy.

Advanced Seminars
Advanced Seminars I, II, and III

Students should have completed their second term before enrolling in the advanced seminars. The advanced seminars are intended to provide guidance for students in the process of formulating a thesis/research essay topic, conducting empirical research, exploring appropriate theoretical approaches and methodologies and developing logical, consistent arguments.


IRP Elective Required Courses

UN and Global Governance
This course examines the role played by the United Nations (and other major international organizations) in the formation of Cold War and post-Cold War international relations. Instead of narrowing the domain of discussion to the traditional security functions, sessions of this course are designed to improve students’ understandings of the role of the UN in maintaining peace and prosperity of the world community in a wider context characterized by the concept of “global governance” which, with its roots in traditional ideas regarding the maintenance of international order, regime and system, has been substantially developed by various schools of IR theories in recent years. Alongside political and security aspects, economic development, cultural exchange, human rights issues, and regionalism will also be taken into consideration in course of the lecture. Collaboration between the UN and NGOs will be put under scrutiny as well.

Comparative Politics and Society
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to a variety of ideas about and perspectives on the liberal democratic tradition and its rivals so that each student can develop his/her own understanding of the varied and complex patterns which characterize national decision making. For that purpose, various theories on political parties, party systems and political systems will be introduced. Case studies will also be discussed. Theories to be examined include those concerning the nature and categorization of political parties; those concerning party systems; parliamentary systems; electoral systems; postmaterialism; and consensus models as opposed to the Westminster (majoritarian) model.

Contemporary Political and Economic Regionalism
The rising tide of regionalism has been a striking feature in international relations during the 1990s and the early years of the twenty-first century. Initially, most analysts regarded regionalism as a European phenomenon, modeled upon the institutions established in postwar Europe, then merged into the current European Union and successively, though unsuccessfully, applied in the so-called developing countries of Latin America and Africa. Since the end of the Cold War, however, regionalism has become more diversified, and the European model has mostly been rejected as inapplicable. Instead, new variants of regionalism have emerged, both in conceptual terms as well as in political practice, most dramatically in Southeast Asia but, to some extent, also in Latin America and parts of Africa. 'New regionalism' has become a serious rival and better appreciated strategic and conceptual alternative to globalization. The course aims at allowing students to develop and sharpen their own views about past and ongoing processes of regional integration and regional cooperation. It does so by contextualizing regionalism with its history in various parts of the world, thereby contending the perception that regionalism is essentially of European origin.

Global Issues: UNU Global Seminar
This seminar is held in September and is sponsored by the United Nations University. Students from other universities with an interest in international affairs also participate.

IRP Elective Required Courses

Asia and Japan in the Pre-War Period
This course will examine international politics in East Asia and the Western Pacific during the period extending from the height of the Age of Imperialism in the mid-nineteenth century, through the First World War, until the eve of World War II. The objectives of the course are to identify the elements of continuity and change in regional affairs, to disentangle and clarify relationships of cause and effect, and to demonstrate the continuing relevance of history to the understanding of contemporary events. This is a wide ranging course and many issues will be discussed during the semester. A particularly close study will be made of Japan’s domestic politics, diplomacy and evolving strategic posture during these years. Here, attention will be focussed on the complex interaction of East Asian and Western traditions, institutions and ideologies, on factional policy conflicts and on the impact of these factors on the country’s developing relationships with the British Empire, Imperial Russia and the Soviet Union, the United States, Germany, France, China, Korea, Mongolia and the lands of Southeast Asia.

OPEC and Economic Development
This course analyzes the economic development and related socio-political problems of oil exporting countries, focusing on the Gulf OPEC members. The economic cooperation of Japan and other advanced nations with these oil exporting countries will also be examined.

ASEAN Governance and Development
The course examines the relationship between governance and development in Southeast Asia on two levels. The issue is, what kind of governance promotes better development? At the first level the course examines regionalism and its role in fostering stability for development. At the second level the course will examine the governance structures of the major ASEAN members in terms of the development of the past two decades. Which have been more successful in terms of recovering after the financial crisis of 1997-98? This is the key question.

Society and Culture in the Islamic World
This course seeks to identify key concepts which are essentially important for understanding the religion of Islam, Islamic culture, and Islamic world. It offers clear-cut explanation concerning TAWHID, Islamic world-view, SHARI'A, Islamic law and 'UMMA, Islamic community. Basing on the exact knowledge about the interrelationship of these three core elements, it aPhoto of International Relations / Economics graduate programs in Japannalyses various socio-cultural aspects of the Islamic World and finally introduces basic problems of the modern Islamic society.

Japanese Political Culture and Foreign Policy
This course analyzes Japanese political culture, in its historical context, focusing on the question of how the forces that occupy the strategic heights of the nation's power structure (conservative parties, the bureaucracy, the business community and other groups) have interacted with each other, on the character and evaluation of political factionalism, and the continuing significance of geostrategic-cultural orientations such as "Westernism" and "Asianism." The impact of these factors on Japan's post-war external relations is then examined in detail.

Postwar Japanese Politics and Foreign Policy: Special Seminar
Students are often too busy with assignments to read books thoughtfully, from cover to cover. This course, offered on alternate years, attempts to remedy this problem. Students are required to undertake a close, detailed study of some of the most significant works on postwar Japanese politics and foreign policy available in the English language.

Postwar Japanese Economy
This course studies the postwar Japanese economy from both an historical and an empirical perspective. The Japanese economy achieved high economic growth and overcame the oil crises in the decades after the World War II. The course analyses the factors which lay behind the development of the Japanese economy focusing on the roles of the government and of the private sector. The contemporary Japanese economy is also subjected to econometric analysis.

Contemporary Japanese Politics
This course is designed to give students a general introduction to the political system of Japan. The content of the course will include the principles of political culture, political institutions and public policymaking.

 Japanese Political Economy
This course focuses on selected issues in the political economy of contemporary Japan. The primary focus will be the interaction between Japanese political and economic institutions, and public policy. The class is a mixture of lecture- and seminar-styles.

Japanese Public Finance and Administration
This course analyzes the system of Japanese public finance and administration. Japan has employed a centralized system, introducing various Western social mechanisms after the Meiji Restoration, and succeeded in catching up with the West. After World War II, the Japanese government introduced Keynsian policies to strengthen social infrastructures. This stimulated both the supply side and the demand side of the economy but resulted in a large amount of government debt. In the course, the roles of the central and local governments are examined, tracing the public money flows through taxation, local tax allocation system and so on.

Religion, Society and Culture in Japan
This Special Seminar is designed to teach the skills and knowledge necessary to conduct econometric modeling and forecasting with PC (personal computer). Participants develop a macro econometric model of a specific country and make economic forecasts through scenario simulation based on various economic theories. The course is held in seminar style so that the students have opportunities both for group discussion and for individual sessions with the instructor.

Chinese Politics & Foreign Policy
The aim of this course is to help students understand the linkages between China’s domestic politics and its foreign policy. The focus of this course is to analyze Chinese domestic politics and foreign relations since the economic modernization and reform. In the first part of this course, the following topics will be analyzed: (1) the changing roles of ideology; (2) the Chinese Communist Party; (3) political leadership and political succession; (4) the People’s Liberation Army; (5) politics of economic modernization and reform. The second part analyzes China’s current foreign relations, which include the following topics: (1) Sino-US relations; (2) Sino-Japanese relations; (3) Sino-Korean relations; (4) China and the ASEAN states; (5) China’s oil diplomacy.

Chinese Economy
The course outlines the structure of Chinese economy as well as China's economic growth after 1979. First, it reviews the growth of Chinese economy at the macro-level. The evolution from a central planning economy to a mixed economy is the background of the review. It will then discuss the dynamic change of Chinese economic policies through the reforms in the agriculture, industry, foreign trade sectors as well as banking and financial markets.

Japan-US Relations
This class has two aims: first, it seeks to provide students with analytical skills necessary to examine current U.S.-Japan relations. Second, it will serve as a platform for a joint research project with Johns Hopkins University's School of Advanced International Studies to publish an annual briefing book on U.S.-Japan relations in 2005 to cover the period of April 2004 - March 2005. Contemporary Japanese Politics (fall term) is strongly recommended as a background for this course. The briefing book aims to provide all the information and background that a mythical freshman Congressman would need to read on the plane as he/she flies to Japan for the first time -- in 100 pages. Please be aware that this is NOT a lecture-based class, but a seminar-style, self-research-and-writing class. Course preparation, including group forming and topic assignment, starts during the fall term.

Development of Japanese Industry and Business
How did Japan achieve a rapid economic development? Why does Japan have its unique economic and business systems? These are questions asked in this course. It analyzes the history and process of Japanese industrialization and also the transformation of Japanese industrial and business systems from 1868 to the present. The focus will be on such factors as: industrial relations, industrial organization, government-business relations, trading firms, and management systems.

Other IRP Elective Courses

Governance Structure and Economic Development
This course cultivates the analytical capability of students to understand and discern the internal conditions and external environment of governance structures in the context of economic development.
How did Japan achieve a rapid economic development? Why does Japan have its unique economic and business systems? These are questions asked in this course. It analyzes the history and process of Japanese industrialization and also the transformation of Japanese industrial and business systems from 1868 to the present. The focus will be on such factors as: industrial relations, industrial organization, government-business relations, trading firms, and management systems.

IPSP Core Required Courses

Global Governance of Human Security
This course studies the evolution of global institutions, organizations and various other arrangements that aim at protecting the lives and livings of individuals in the human society from poverty and armed violence under globalization. The issues of global governance of human security involve many actors and wide areas of academic disciplines and are related to many courses in IPSP. Being complementary to other courses, the scope of this course is rather limited. It examines the issues in three areas: poverty and income inequality, civil wars, and international migration. The thread that links the three areas of our study is the theory of institutions. We will also employ quantitative models and statistical tools to evaluate the implications of the theoretical models.

Risk Management under Globalization
The sense of insecurity has been increasing among people in the world, in both high income and low income countries. Traditional institutions and organizations do not appear to be functioning effectively to restore the sense of security in people’s daily lives. What lies below the sea change in the sense of security among peoples in the past decades, particularly in high income countries, is the emergence of new risks associated with globalization. A strong demand now exists for identifying the new risks and the changes of old risks and establishing institutions and organizations to manage them effectively at various levels in the world, including cooperative relationships among individuals, local communities, business organizations, NGO/NPOs, governments and international organizations. First, this course studies the changes in the risks and their structures in people’s daily lives, including the risks such as global climate change, infectious disease (such as SARS, avian flu, HIV/AIDS), disease caused by pollution, drugs and poisonous food, crimes, and traffic, nuclear power plant and other accidents. Then we will evaluate successes and failures of various institutional arrangements to manage the risks, and explore the possibilities of finding better arrangements.

International Peace and Security
This course examines the threats to international peace and security and the means by which they may be reduced or eliminated. The course will stress the importance of preemptive collective action and international institutions such as the Kyoto protocol in managing environmental problems; it will stress UN peace keeping and peace making in relation to communal conflict, and international regimes and conventions in relation to the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. It will also cover the topic of international terrorism and how cooperation may be fostered to deal with this issue. It will conclude on the significance of norms of cooperation and institutions for global peace and security.

International Conflict Resolution
The course examines the ways in which conflicts between states and within states may be managed or resolved. It will identify the various theories of international conflict and will introduce students to concepts of mediation and negotiation, conflict management and peace making. It will also examine the approaches towards conflict resolution including collective diplomacy, third party mediation, and the role of the UN and its agencies above all. Particular cases will be studied including the Middle East, former Yugoslavia, Sierra Leone, Rwanda as well as Sri Lanka and Lebanon. It will stress that resolving conflict requires a long term effort at peace building which embraces notions of development and governance reforms.

Peace and Development
Peace (the negative peace of Galtung) and development has re-emerged as an increasing number of countries have been exposed to either intra-ethnic or inter-states conflicts (absence of peace). The root causes for those conflicts vary from region to region, country to country, and conflict to conflict. Absence of peace, irrespective of the underlined reasons of its origin, brings devastating impacts on the development. On the contrary, another school of thought argues that failures in the development process run the risk of generating conflicts. Is development condition for peace or vice versa? Despite this debate over the causation, there is inseparable link between peace and development. The course examines this complex nature between peace and development taking broader perspectives into consideration and ways to achieve them in a sustainable manner.

Human Rights and Global Justice
This course examines international law and norms of behaviour as a basis for global justice and human rights. It will stress the importance of norms of behaviour as a foundation for law and the regulation of global issues and then will move to concepts of social justice and human rights. It will identify the role of the UN, international legal conventions and international non governmental organisations [INGOs] in establishing a normative basis for global justice and human rights. The course will also survey the major issues of global justice and will identify common norms for their regulation or resolution; the course will cover issues such as global poverty and inequality, the treatment of political prisoners and refugees, and the international trafficking in women. The course will also propose ways in which global standards of human rights may be accepted, and ways in which different cultures may come to common agreement.

INGOs and Global Civil Society
The course examines the Gramscian concept of civil society and analyses the relationship between state, society and individual in the context of emerging globalisation. It will then identify factors relevant to the development of global civil society, which include the democratisation of transnational activity and the inadequacy of the state in facing the new challenges of globalisation. The importance of international NGOs [INGOs] in mobilizing civil society and individual activists to deal with issues of global social justice and the environmental will be stressed in the course. The activities of specific INGOs such as Greenpeace International, the Red Cross, Medecins sans frontiers, Amnesty International, Oxfam and Christian Aid will be surveyed in the course. The positive role they have assumed for global governance will be identified in terms of a democratic response to globalisation. The course will conclude on the significance of global civil society in posing a democratic alternative to globalisation.

IPSP Elective Courses

Public International Law
Law plays an indispensable, if not necessarily central, role in society. Not only does law curb the harmful behaviour of its addressees; it also promotes and facilitates interaction between them. In addition, law provides for the protection of basic social values. Indeed, any socially responsible conduct involves a degree of familiarity with the law applicable to it. The same is increasingly true in today's international society. Modern international law concerns itself with a broad spectrum of matters between, across and even within states. For both scholars and practitioners of international affairs, general proficiency in international law is now a prerequisite. In this course, participants critically explore international law's fundamental structures; salient issues it deals with, such as force, terrorism, human rights and the environment; and the consequences of its breaches. Designed for students with or without prior legal training, the course will prepare them for their future endeavours in politics, diplomacy, international civil service, peace and security, human rights, development and environmental protection.

International Humanitarian Law
Was it lawful for NATO to bomb a Belgrade radio station? Who are the "unprivileged" combatants in detention at Guantanamo? Does it matter if the crisis in Darfur constitutes genocide or not? Should Cambodia, East Timor and other post-conflict communities punish war criminals, or should they promote truth and reconciliation? Articulating informed responses to these questions involves familiarising oneself with the way in which war is to be normatively regulated. In this course, participants examine the basic tenets of international humanitarian law and international criminal law. They analyse the laws applicable to armed hostilities and the treatment of victims in international and internal conflicts, the theory and practice of war crimes prosecution and the administration of international criminal justice. Suitable for lawyers and non-lawyers alike, this course will be of particular interest to those specialising or considering careers in international politics, security, peacekeeping, conflict resolution, human rights and humanitarian affairs.

Project Cycle Management (FASID Course)
This course is designed to provide students with a practical knowledge of the management method, skill and tool for development projects including ODA projects and NGO’s projects. We will start with the concept of development project and project management. We will focus on Project Cycle Management that is one of management methods widely used at the planning, implementing and evaluating stages of development projects. The course introduces some relevant cases and lectures’ experience, which enables students to understand how projects are planned, monitored and evaluated in the real context. Some important concepts for project formulation such as participatory development, ownership by stakeholders, institutional development, gender issue, environmental aspects and appropriate technology will be discussed, also. MDGs, PRSP, Aid Coordination and harmonization will be covered.

Governance Structure and Economic Development
The course cultivates the analytical capability of students to understand and discern the internal conditions and external environment of governance structures in the context of economic development.

Political Economy of Energy and Environment
The course analyzes the historical world-wide development of the oil and natural gas industries, relations between OPEC/OAPEC and oil importing countries, the first and second oil crises, and the recent oil glut situation The problem of securing energy supplies while maintaining a healthy ecology and environment will also be explored.

Environmental Economics
This course is aimed to provide a guide to the important areas of environmental economics. Lectures try to motivate students to use analytical tools to deal with the environmental problems. Given the limited number of lectures, the course focuses on efficiency, market failure, market-based incentives for environmental protection, regulation of pollution, transboundary pollution, and problems arising from uncertainty about environmental discharges and asymmetric information about pollution control costs. This course focuses on both the theoretical aspects of the environmental problems and applications to real problems.

UN and Global Governance
The course introduces techniques and models of socio-economic development planning and policy analysis. It discusses the structure, major components, and process of socio-economic development planning.

Global Issues: UNU Global Seminar Governance
This course examines selected issues in international relations by participating in the Global Seminar sponsored by the United Nations University and organized by 9 other universities. Each year, the seminar invites UN officials, specialists and scholars, and have intensive discussions with them and other participants in English. Your requirements for the seminar is to actively participate in lectures by distinguished scholars and experts in the field, to engage in questions and group discussions. Second, you are to write a 10 page double spaced paper with reference and notes on the theme of the UN seminar.

Japanese Political Culture & Foreign Policy
This course analyses Japanese political culture, in its historical context, focussing on the question of how the forces that occupy the strategic heights of the nation's power structure (conservative parties, the bureaucracy, the business community and other groups) have interacted with each other, on the character and evaluation of political factionalism, and the continuing significance of geostrategic-cultural orientations such as "Westernism" and "Asianism." The impact of these factors on Japan's postwar external relations is then examined in detail.

Postwar Japanese Politics & Foregin Policy: Special Seminar
Students are often too busy with assignments to read books thoughtfully, from cover to cover. This course, offered on alternate years, attempts to remedy this problem. Students are required to undertake a close, detailed study of some of the most significant works on postwar Japanese politics and foregin policy available in the English language.

Japanese Political Economy
This course focuses on selected issues in the political economy of contemporary Japan. The primary focus will be the interaction between Japanese political and economic institutions, and public policy. It first looks at how postwar political institutions (e.g., the structure of the bureau- cracy; the long-dominance of the Liberal Democratic Party) shaped Japanese politics and public policy to promote economic growth. Second, it examines how the old system became out of date as Japan has become a world economic power; and finally explores how the system will change through policy reforms (such as deregulation). The class is seminar-style and is designed for graduate students with some background in Japanese politics.

Contemporary Japanese Politics
This course is designed to give the student a general introduction to the political system of Japan. The contents of the course will include the principles of political culture, political institutions and public policymaking. The format of the course will be lecture and discussion. As the course is an introductory course, most class time will be given to lecture. The most important goal, however, is to gain the basic understanding of the current politics. Therefore, there will also be much discussion of both the readings and of contemporary events.

Religion, Society and Culture in Japan
This course tries to highlight the nature of interrelationship between systems of religion and thought, and various aspects of Japanese society and culture, putting special emphasis on the history of management. Introducing key factors and elements of things Japanese, the course will offer basic knowledge of the nature and history of Japanese society and management.

Japanese Public Finance and Administration
The course analyzes the system of the Japanese public finance and administration. Japan has employed a centralized system introducing Western countries’ various social mechanisms since Meiji Restoration and succeeded in catching up with the Western countries. After the WWWⅡ, the Japanese government introduced Keynes policy to strengthen social infrastructures that stimulated both supply side and demand side of the economy with a large amount of government debts. In the course, the role of central and local government is examined elucidating the public money flows through taxation, local allocation tax system, etc.

Development of Japanese Industry and Business
How did Japan achieve a rapid economic development? Why does Japan have its unique economic and business systems? These are questions asked in this course. It analyzes the history and process of Japanese industrialization and also the transformation of Japanese industrial and business systems from 1868 to the present. I shall focus on such factors as: industrial relations, industrial organization, government_business relations, trading firms, and management systems.

Society & Culture in the Islamic World
This course seeks to identify key concepts which are essentially important for understanding the religion of Islam, Islamic culture, and Islamic world. It offers clear-cut explanation concerning TAWHID, Islamic world-view, SHARI'A, Islamic law and 'UMMA, Islamic community. Basing on the exact knowledge about the interrelationship of these three core elements, it analyses various socio-cultural aspects of the Islamic World and finally introduces basic problems of the modern Islamic society.

ASEAN Governance and Development
The course examines the relationship between governance and development in Southeast Asia on two levels. The issue is what kind of governance is better promotes development. At the first level the course examines regionalism and its role in fostering stability for development. At the second level the course will examine the governance structures of the major ASEAN members in terms of the development of the past two decades. Which have been more successful in terms of recovering after the financial crisis of 1997-98? This is the key question.

Public Management ("Public Sector Economics" for IDP)
The world economy is contemplating a further round of deregulation and privatization. In this dynamic context, it is critical to understand what economic activities government should or should not be responsible for and why. This course provides a theoretical framework to analyze actual public sector economic issues as well as practical applications of that framework.

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Address: 777 Kokusai-cho, Minami Uonuma-shi, Niigata, Japan
Some interested visitors submitting program inquiries to our school up to 2019-10-12 were from:

SOKA, SAITAMA, Japan;   Nhlangano,Shiselweni, Hluti, Swaziland;   Petaling jaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia;   riyadh, Saudi Arabia;   Cairo, Egypt;   Toronto, Canada;   Bhaktapur, Nepal;   Nepal-Kathmandu, Nepal;   Toluca, México, Mexico;   Kumasi, Ghana;   and more.
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